The 20th Annual Victims' Rights Run & Walk
In collaboration with the Aimee Willard Endowed Scholarship Fund

 

Remembering Aimee Willard


Aimee Willard was a student-athlete from Brookhaven, Pennsylvania, and an accomplished member of the George Mason University's Women's Soccer and Lacrosse teams. Aimee earned All-American honors for her outstanding success in lacrosse and All-Conference honors for her contributions to the soccer team. Tragically, in June 1996, her life was ended by a brutal act of violence by a man who had been previously convicted of murder in Nevada and was released after serving 11 years of a life sentence.

In response to Aimee's tragic death and to aid future cases, legislation known as "Aimee's Law" was passed in 2000. Aimee's Law uses federal crime fighting funds to create an incentive for states to adopt stricter sentencing and truth-in-sentencing laws. The law will hold states financially accountable for the tragic consequences of an early release which results in a violent crime being perpetrated on the citizens of another state.

Aimee's Law

Division C of Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection
Act of 2000


SINGLE STATE - In any case in which a State convicts an individual of murder, rape, or a dangerous sexual offense, who has a prior conviction for any one of those offenses in a State, the Attorney General shall transfer an amount equal to the costs of incarceration, prosecution, and apprehension of that individual, from Federal Law enforcement assistant funds that have been allocated but not distributed to the State that convicted the individual of the prior offense, to the State that collects Federal law enforcement assistance funds of the State that convicted that individual of the subsequent offense.

MULTIPLE STATES - In any case in which a State convicts an individual of murder, rape, or a dangerous sexual offense, who has a prior conviction for any one or more of those offenses in more than one other State, the Attorney General shall transfer an amount equal to the costs of incarceration, prosecution, and apprehension of that individual, from Federal law enforcement assistance funds that have been allocated to but not distributed to each State that convicted such individual of the prior offense, to the State account that collects Federal law enforcement assistance funds of the State that convicted that individual of the subsequent offense.

The Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act was passed by the U.S. Congress in 2000 and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on October 28, 2000. It has popularly become known as "Aimee's Law."

To make a gift to the Aimee Willard Endowed Scholarship Fund, please visit give.gmu.edu, select Other Established Fund and note Aimee Willard Endowed Scholarship Fund.